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The Dunnock (Prunella modularis) name derives from the Old English word for 'little brown'. Also known as Hedge Sparrow or Hedge Accentor, it is an abundant British breeding garden bird which looks like a dull sleek sparrow. However, it is not a sparrow - it's an accentor, and originates in the Himalayas. All accentors but the dunnock and the Japanese accentor are inhabitants of the mountainous regions of Europe and Asia. ‘Prunella’ comes from the Latin word prunus, and refers to the rufous brown upperparts of the dunnock. ‘Modularis’ comes from the Latin word modulari, which means to sing or warble. Dunnocks look for food under hedges, lawns, along the edges of fields, garden feeders – usually ground feeders searching for insects among leaves. Sexes are alike - brown above streaked with soft black, and an ash grey face and breast. The dunnock does not breed in pairs. It breeds in groups. The groups could be 3 males and three females, but two females with two males are normal.
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