The Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), a species of caprine native to rocky mountains in North Africa, name originates from that of the Berbers, the oldest known inhabitants of the region, and was for centuries associated with the coastal pirates who preyed upon Mediterranean shipping, Also known as aoudad, Barbary sheep have inhabited all the major mountains of North Africa. In the late 1800s, they were introduced into Europe, including Germany and Italy. Both male and female Barbary sheep have large horns. The colour of their coat helps them to remain camouflaged against the sandy rocks of the North African mountains. Barbary sheep are sometimes be mistaken for goats but are distinguished by longer tails and the mane of long hair on their legs and throat. They are very agile and can achieve a standing jump of more than two metres – they have microscopic suction cups on the bottom of their hoofs which help them climb straight up rock structures.
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