The Shore Lark (Eremophila alpestris flava) is known as the Horned Lark in North America which is actually more appropriate, as only the northern Eurasian subspecies flava (pictured) regularly winters in coastal habitats, while the species’ most obvious feature is its ‘horns’, formed by two pointed black feathers jutting out backwards on either side of the crown, most prominently in males. Forty-two subspecies are recognised and is found widely across much of the northern hemisphere, even penetrating into South America, with a relict subspecies in Colombia. It is mainly brown-grey above and pale below, with a striking black and yellow face pattern. The summer male has black "horns", hence its American name.
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