The Bohemian waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus) is named Boehmian because it is a wanderer – flying in flocks looking for fruiting trees on which to feed – and all waxwings are named for the long glossy red tips on the secondary feather shafts in the middle of their wings which looks like the sealing wax used on old letters and envelopes. Bohemian Waxwings have grey bellies and rich cinnamon under the tail whereas Cedar Waxwings have yellowish bellies and white under the tail. The Bohemian is a starling-sized passerine bird that breeds in the northern forests of the Palearctic and North America. Flocks can invade the UK and Europe in large numbers (called 'irruptions') if the berry crops fail in Scandinavia. It has mainly buff-grey plumage, black face markings and a pointed crest. The Bohemian Waxwing breeds in open evergreen and mixed forests near lakes, ponds, or streams in northern North America and Eurasia. During the non-breeding season it roams through open woodlands, urban areas, roadsides, and parks, stopping wherever it finds fruit.
See also: Cedar waxwing, Waxwings
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